What Is Follow On In Crickett: Rules, Calculation, And Advantages Related To It

If you are addicted to watching test cricket, then you must have heard the term follow-on in cricket.

For those who wonder what is follow on in cricket, it’s a rule that allows the team batting first to take advantage of the low first innings score of the other team.

When the first team (who batted first) manages to get a lead of more than 200 after the end of the first innings of the second team,

then they can force follow-on and the team batting second have to start their second innings immediately after the first innings. 

The decision to enforce follow-on depends upon the captain of the team. Read on to find rules and calculations related to enforcing follow-on in cricket and its advantages. 

Read More: Find Out Who Is In Indian Women’s Cricket Team With Photos

Basics about Follow-on in Cricket

what is follow on in cricket

Follow-on defines a team following their first innings, in case the opponent gets 200 run lead at the end of the first innings.

Then, the team captain possessing the lead can decide whether he wants to implement a follow-on or not. 

In test cricket, both teams have to bat for two innings, and the winner is decided based on an overall estimation of runs in both innings.

However, the follow-on rule comes into play when a team batting first in the first innings gets a lead of 200 after the end of the first innings of the opponent team.

In such a situation, the team batting first has the option to enforce follow-on upon the other team. 

When follow-on is enforced, the second team with a lower first inning score has to start their second innings immediately after finishing their first innings.

This situation gives the team with the lead a better chance of finishing the game early in their favor. 

Read More: See Where Is Asia Cup Will Be Held

Rules for Follow-on in Test Cricket

what is follow on in cricket

While few things are in action while enforcing a follow-on, the major rule remains to have 200 plus lead after innings.

So, for example, if in the first innings, the team batting first gets a lead of 200 after the second team is finished with their first inning, they have the option to enforce the follow-on. 

If he chooses not to enforce the follow-on, they will start their first inning to set a decent total for the second innings.

Let’s understand the whole scenario with the help of an example, say two teams, A and B, are playing a test match.

Team A, batting first, scores 430 runs. Now, Team B, in their first innings, scores 200 runs. Now it’s time for team A to decide whether to enforce follow-on or not. 

When team A decides to enforce the follow-on, they can force the other team (B) to start their second innings right at the end of the first innings of Team B.

On the other hand, if follow-on is not enforced, team A will bat and set a target in the second innings, then Team B will chase the total in their second innings.

How Do I Calculate The Follow-On In Test Cricket?

what is follow on in cricket

The calculation of how many runs a team will require to win will be based on the scores of two teams in the first two innings.

The number of runs required to be scored in the second innings is calculated by dividing the current score (in the first innings) by the first score in the second innings. 

If a team batting first gets a lead of 200 after the end of the first innings, then they have the option to enforce follow-on or not.

If team B scores above this number (200+), then follow-on is enforced, and the second team has a defensive role until they reach 200 plus total score.

Learn More: What Did “Does It Again” Cheteshwar Pujara “Does It Again”

Enforcing a follow-on in Test cricket

If the captain of the team, following their first inning, decides to enforce the follow-on, they will have a better chance of winning the game quickly.

It is often seen that matches where follow-on is enforced end in three to four days in favor of the team enforcing it. 

However, enforcing follow-on also comes with its own set of disadvantages. Let’s take a brief look at both to get a better idea about enforcing follow-on in favor of your team.

Advantage

  • When a team forces follow-on and the second team is put under extreme pressure, then they will have the chance to win the game quickly. This is because the team with a lead in the first innings can easily finish the game within two or three sessions.
  • Enforcing follow-on boosts the confidence of players, especially bowlers. If the conditions are overcast and bowlers are in great rhythm, they can carry this moment into the second innings and finish things in their favor. 
  • You also can’t deny that a leading team in the first innings has an advantage o getting to complete their second innings. 

Disadvantage

  • Once you enforce follow in a match and the opponent team performs extra=ordinarily, you will be left with a big target to chase in the game’s fourth innings. Unfortunately, batting in the fourth innings of a match is not always easy, and even great players fall prey to the pressure of the fourth innings. 
  • In case of bad weather or extreme light, you are left with no time to recover in the second innings. In such situations, it is best to enforce the follow-on, but if you think you can’t chase the target set by an opponent team in the fourth innings, try not to enforce it.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q1. How much is the follow-on in cricket?
Follow-on comes into action only when the team with the lead in the first innings gets 200 plus runs lead at the end of the first inning. 

Q2. Has any team won after the follow-on?
After a team enforces follow-on, their chances are either winning or ending the match in a draw. Generally, 90 percent of matches end in favor of the team implementing follow-on. 

Leave a Comment